Saturday , 3 December 2016

‘Sit and Rise’ test said to predict your Death

Ever wondered how long you will live? A doctor in Brazil invented a test that helps predict your risk of dying in the next five years. The good news is you can try it at home!

Balance and strength can be good indicators of overall health, but the “sitting and rising” test looks specifically at musculoskeletal movement as a way to predict mortality.

A doctor in Brazil invented the Sitting Rising Test or SRT, and he’s proven it can predict your risk of dying in the next five years.

When it comes to figuring out how healthy you are, and long you might live, a cardiac stress test is often considered the gold-standard for giving doctors very specific information.

Dr. Marc Gillinov, a Cleveland Clinic cardiologist, said the sit/rise test is a simple way to measure your overall health. “This is what we call an observation study, which means it’s not of highest level of medical evidence, but I believe it to be true; I believe it makes sense. If you are in better physical shape, you are in overall better health.”

The goal is to get down and back up from a sitting position with minimal support. It can be used in all age groups, and results are based on a scale of one to 10. Score three or less and your risk of dying is five times greater over the next five years.

(Don’t try it with knee or hip injuries.)

Step 1:

Stand straight and barefooted. Without leaning or using support, lower yourself onto the floor into the sitting position with legs crossed.

Step 2:

Stand back up without any support.

-You get 5 points for sitting and another 5 points for standing without any support
-Subtract 1 point each time you use a hand, forearm, knee or side of the leg
-Lose a half point if you lose your balance

Scoring:
8-10 points = GREAT
6-7.5 = GOOD
3.5-5.5 = FAIR
0-3 = POOR (You’re 6.5 times more likely to die than those who scored high.)

According to the study, the more you improve your score, the better your mortality rate!

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