Suffer From Migraines? This Drink Will Soothe the Pain in Minutes!

One of my former partners used to suffer from the absolute worst migraines.  They would leave her bed-ridden, incapacitated, and reeling from the sudden, sharp jolts of pain in her head.  While her migraines were undoubtedly a bit more severe than your average, she is not alone in her suffering.

Over 36 million people in the United States are affected by migraines, which is close to one out of every ten people!

While a migraine might get you off of work for the day, the intense pain doesn’t let you enjoy much of anything.  The constant head-throbbing and pounding can push even the most grounded people off of their game, as their duration can change wildly; they can last anywhere from four to seventy-two hours.

Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, numbness, tingling sensations, dizziness and sensitivity to lights, noises and smells.

Migraines are believed to be caused by a wide variety of different factors, including stress, alcohol consumption, allergies and deficiencies in the body.  However, it has been seen that the biggest indicator of migraines is dehydration and an electrolyte imbalance.

Electrolytes support and regulate nerve function, they regulate the cardiovascular system, and they regulate muscle function, making them pretty important to a healthy body.  As migraines are an inflammatory response, Magnesium can also be beneficial when seeking relief from a migraine.

The recipe to soothe your aching head is actually pretty simple:

  • 1 Cup of Water
  • Lemon Juice from One Whole Lemon
  • Two Teaspoons of Sea Salt
  • Try to obtain high quality salt, like pink Himalayan sea salt.  This incredibly pure salt has more than eighty different trace minerals, including the aforementioned Magnesium.  When you ingest these minerals quickly, the serotonin levels in your body increase, which directly helps quell pain and inflammation.

While there isn’t a ton of research that readily proves this recipe 100% effective, the fact that it is common practice for nurses to inject electrolyte solutions into IV’s during a migraine patient’s visit should convince most people.

It might be an old remedy, but there’s a reason that people use it.  It works.

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